BULLETIN 10 (2008)

October 15, 2008

Your Health Bulletin is information from scientific literature to make sense of the right choices for your health.  It is a reminder to consider periodic check-ups of your spine, joint mechanics and appropriate exercise.  Maintenance is better than repair!

 

ANTIDEPRESSANTS

 

TEENAGER DEPRESSION, AND PLACEBO
Recently published in the online American Journal of Psychiatry, Jan. 15, 2009, and authored by researcher Dr. B. Kenwood of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre, was a com-parison of active and placebo (sugar pill) treatments for mild to moderate depression of adolescents.  “In terms of every possible way we could look at the patients, adolescents given placebo treatment performed as well or had as positive a response as those given other treatment…” (other treatment being antidepressants and cognitive behaviour therapy, i.e. talking).

 

Comment:


So, why use antidepressant drugs (also the similar antipsychotic drugs)?
Better yet, why not remove the food proteins which create the depressive state?  Refer to Rothesay Chiropractic Centre Newsletter #9 & #10 which explains the brain and food, and ill effects of anti-depressant. (One of the side effects for adolescents is suicide.)  Also, refer to Chapter 9 in the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, M.D., & Ron Hoggan, M.A., which is available at our office.  Testing for harmful foods can be done through urine/saliva testing. Inquire in our office about this procedure as explained in our Handout #210.

 

ANTIDEPRESSANTS : TROUBLING
The Jan. 15, 2009 New England Journal of Medicine contains an article titled “Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs and the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death”.

Atypical psychotic drugs – Risperdal, Seroquel, Zyprexa and Colozaril – used by patients aged 30 to 74, carried a significantly higher risk of sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias and other cardiac causes, the risk increasing with increased dose.  The death rate was twice that of the population not taking the drugs, and the same as those taking the typical antipsychotics such as Haldol and Mellaril.

 

These atypical antipsychotic drugs are used to treat agitation, anxiety, psychotic episodes, obsessive behaviour, schizophrenia, mania and depression.  They are preferred because they are less likely than the more typical antipsychotics to cause tremors and other serious movement disorders.  The researchers conclude that atypical antipsychotics are no safer than typical antipsychotics.

 

Comment:


Why would anybody want to use these or other mood-altering drugs when there is a way that is safe, and controllable by you, to manage the difficulty?  Refer to Rothesay Chiropractic Centre Newsletters 9 & 10 which provide evidence from the scientific literature on the relationship between the brain, food, and inflammation.  If you don’t have access to our website on the internet, ask at our office for a paper copy.  If you wish to have measurable evidence of body chemistry and inflammation being altered, then inquire about urine and saliva testing, see Handout #210, or speak with Dr. Forgie.

 

 

 

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